Kayaking Clover Pass

 Solo paddle to Clover Island

Solo paddle to Clover Island

There are many ways to enjoy the Knudson Cove area. Fishing, boating, and camping are some examples. Another popular way to get out is kayaking. This past Monday was an exceptionally beautiful day. Melanie, a co-worker, and I jumped in a tandem kayak and headed into Clover Pass. There was a slight breeze, the temps were great, and the sun was shining. We had heard there were seals near Clover Island and decided to head that way. With two people paddling we cruised at a modest rate making it to the island in no time. The backside (from the marina) of the island was a tropical paradise, no wind and pure sunshine. As reported, we ran into a seal. The only thing missing was a sandy beach.

We paddled around Clover checking out tiny cove-like areas. One looked as if a skiff would fit right in it. As we rounded the north end of the island, the current helped us by pushing us toward the marina. By the time we got back to dock, an hour had passed. I can't think of a better way to spend an hour!

 Paddle around Clover Island in

Paddle around Clover Island in

There are multiple loops in the area kayakers can take. The determining factors would be conditions, experience, and amount of time available to kayak. Paddling around Clover Pass is a great way to get a feel for kayaking if you are new to it. There are close islands that can be explored and beaches to pull up to.

If you have questions about kayaking a good person to talk to is Howard McKim of Ketchikan Kayaking Company. He leads tours out of Knudson Cove Marina all summer long. Kayaks are available for rent through the marina. The marina has two tandems and one fishing kayak available. Occasionally, I see people walk down the public boat ramp, plunk a kayak in, and head out for the day. Taking a kayak out allows the possibility of running into sea life very close to the water line. That's as close as it gets without getting wet!

What areas do you enjoy kayaking?